Will Kinesiology increase the range of motion and reduce pain in lower back pain sufferers for a better quality in life?


Abstract

This research aims to study the effects of kinesiology to the range of motion and the level of pain in patients with lower back pain. Inclusion criteria for the study focused on three aspects: pain level, quality of life and range of motion. The research methodology utilized positivism with quantitative measurements of the identified study criteria. There were a total five adult respondents with lower back pain who were subjected to pelvic stress balancing interventions. Outcome measures utilized pain scale of 1 to 10, satisfaction scale of 1 to 5 and quantitative measurement of flexion and extension. Results revealed a significant reduction of pain scale range from 6 to 7 prior to balancing to 1 to 4.5 after balancing, subjects’ satisfaction is high and the range of motion generally showed decrease in flexion. Kinesiology, therefore, is an effective treatment modality in improving the range of motion and reducing the pain experience in patients suffering from low back pain (LBP)

 

Introduction

Low back pain (LBP) is  an activity-limiting aching experience of the lower vertebral area with or without referred pain to one or both lower extremities lasting for at least a day (Hoy et.al. 2010), which can affect one’s performance and well-being.  LBP is a common health concern causing activity limitation, posing a substantial personal and economic burden. In the Global Burden of Diseases, LBP is one of the top occurring causes of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The global prevalence of common or nonspecific LBP in industrialized countries  is around 60 to 70%, which increases and peaks at 35 to 55 years of age. Aging significantly increases LBP because of vertebral disc deterioration (Duthey 2013).  It was reported that approximately 80% adults experience LBP at a certain time in their life, with a prevalence of 12% to 33% in the general population (AlBahel et.al. 2013). LBP is mostly a self-limiting problem that resolves within six weeks in 80 to 90% of patients, while 10 to 20% results into chronic LBP (CLBP).

LBP is commonly treated with analgesics and rehabilitation activities. It is being addressed as a symptom, but the cause is not often being treated. The last recourse of management is vertebral disc surgery if all other regimens fail to resolve the problem (Duthey 2013). There is a growing trend in the exploration of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in managing back pain, one of which, with a promising potential is employing kinesiology and its principles. This study seeks to answer the research problem on the effectiveness of kinesiology in improving the range of motion and reducing the pain sensation in patients with low back pain (LBP).

 

Background

What is LBP?

Low back pain is referred to as the discomfort and pain felt inferiorly of the costal margin and superiorly to the lower gluteal folds, which may occur with or without referred pain to the lower limb/s (Duthey 2013). Lower back pain includes a variety of problems with the discs, lumbar spine, nerves, bones, spinal muscles and tendons. It can occur because of an array of reasons such as damage to joints, ligaments or bones, irritation of large nerve roots around the lower back that go down the legs (sciatica nerve) and smaller nerves that supply the lower back, or strain in the lower back muscles like erector spinae Ullrich (2007). An intervertebral disc may be injured in an accident, due to muscles tightening up, injuring some elements in the spine- the discs and facet joints may also be affected and there is a cascading response. Orthopedists refer to this as discogenic back pain, mechanical back pain or facet pain.

The intensity of LBP ranges from mild to severe which comes with sudden or gradual onset, with varying quality of pain, such as sharp or dull, aching, stabbing, burning, vague, or well-defined. The perceivable heterogeneity in the experience of lower back pain can be catagorized into three, namely: acute, subacute and chronic back pain. Acute back pain lasts for less than 12 weeks, subacute pain for six weeks to three months, and chronic low back pain (CLBP) for more than 7 to 12 weeks, or even include recurring pain episodes that can intermittently occur in a patient for over a long duration.

 

Causes and risk factors

The causes for LBP onset remain obscure, though the incidence has been associated with obesity, occupational posture, depressive moods, age and body height (Duthey 2013). Risk factors in the development of LBP could be attributed to psychological factors, body frame, and occupational factors. Individuals who are dominantly affected by negativity, experiencing high psychological demands at work with low job satisfaction, low level of control, afflicted with anxiety, stress and depression are at higher risk of LBP. Several studies revealed a significant relationship between body height and BP, indicating that taller individuals are more at risk of vertebral disk instability and injury (Duthey 2013). Persons with high BMI or who are obese are more likely to develop LBP, as supported by meta-analysis of 33 studies conducted by Woolf and Pfleger (2003). In the occupational setting, workers whose tasks involve exposure to vibrations and/or long standing positions  makes them prone to LBP. Postural reasons are also accounted for in LBP, like bending heavily, twisting simultaneously.

Causes of LBP vary with different interrelating factors, such as individual characteristics, lifestyle, working conditions and psychological factors. A minimal portion of the total LBP cases is due to trauma, steroid use, osteoporosis, bone metastasis, tumor, and vertebral infections. When the pathology is not specific or recognizable, such in the cases of osteoporosis, tumor, infection, radicular syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, or fracture, it is considered non-specific low back pain. Isolating the exact source of LBP is difficult to surmise, thus, it is hard to diagnose non-specific LBP. It can be related to different problems with structures within the area, which may implicate certain muscles, tissues, ligaments, blood vessels, and joints due to mechanisms like pulling, stretching, straining and inflammatory process.

LBP is a prevalent condition without exact treatment (Eardley et.al. 2013). For years, researchers have been studying various treatments to address low back pain, examples of which are: educational program by Engers (2008); health coaching by Iles (2011); physical exercise by Smeets (2009) and Taylor (2007); pharmacological therapy by Roelofs (2008); electrotherapy by Khadilkar (2008); and spinal manipulation therapy by Assendelft (2004). Practitioners in health and health-related fields have their own preferences and specializations on the modalities they see best for their clients.

Guarino (2010) describes how approximately 80% of adults will suffer some sort of back pain at some time in their lives. Using a medical perspective, he explains that lower back pain is most commonly limited to six weeks with recovery without surgery. Treatment for lower back pain depends upon the patient’s history and the type and severity of pain. Guarino specified that exercises are almost always part of a treatment plan.

Compared to the mainstream medical treatment approach, kinesiology which is the topic in this research is also concerned about movement (Glass, Hatzel & Albrecht, 2014). Applied kinesiology, particularly involves muscle monitoring as a bio-feedback system to indicate where the stresses are in the body, in order to identify what is needed for the client to become balanced and overcome their presenting issues. A kinesiologist may recommend techniques from other methods such as yoga and pilates or even refer clients on, to assist with back movement capabilities (Owen & Lebowitz, 2013) such as to improve flexing forwards, extending backwards, bending laterally to the left or right side, or twisting right to left. However, the main goal of kinesiology is to assist clients in clearing their energy blockages, releasing stresses, and increasing the flow of Chi in the meridians (Krebs, O’Neill and McGowan, 2010).

Flexion-relaxation (FR) is a normal muscular activity during trunk flexion when lumbar muscles contract and relax, a distinct characteristic of flexion range of motion (ROM) (Paolono, et.al.). In CLBP however, there is difficulty in achieving  FR leading further debilities. In kinesiology, range of motion is improved and pain has been hown to be significantly alleviated. Kinesiology, derived from the Greek term ‘kinesis,’ referring to motion, is the study of muscles and movement in the body, or  the mechanics of body movements. The American chiropractor Dr. George Goodheart, the founder of Applied Kinesiology in 1964, utilized the model of muscle testing developed by Kendal and Kendal in 1930s, as a basis of evaluation of his chiropractic practice (ASK n.d.). Dr. Goodheart used the term Applied Kinesiology (AK) pertaining to the system of application  entailing muscle testing for  diagnostic and therapeutic purposes to address different aspects of patient care.

Kinesio taping (KT) is a related technique developed in the 1970s by Kenzo Kase, which has been used in the management of CLBP. KT is effective in many musculoskeletal conditions, though the exact mechanism is not yet established. It is believed that to foster interaction with neuromuscular function with the aid of mechanoceptor activation (Paoloni et.al. 2011).  In this technique, an elastic thin tape is applied to the skin, which can be stretched to 120-140% of its original length allowing for lesser restriction compared to conventional tape. The four common benefits of kinesio taping and kinesiology in general are as follows: normalization of muscle functions, reduced pain, improved lymphatic and vascular flow, and helping in the correction of joint misalignment.

 

 

Research Design

Research method to be used is positivism with quantitative measures of aspects before and after using kinesiology with lower back pain clients. The research project is based on a hypothesis that kinesiology will improve the lower back pain condition on various dimensions which are range of motion, level of pain, and quality of life. In terms of range of motion, although kinesiologists may refer clients to other alternative practices, such as yoga. However, in this research project a pelvic stress balance has been selected because it uses all the muscles surrounding the lower back. If this balancing is effective, then the clients should achieve homeostasis. Homeostasis is difficult to measure so instead improvement in functioning will be used to see if homeostatis has been achieved.  Therefore, the design of this research is to measure before and after five or six treatments of pelvic stress balancing, for changes in range of movement, level of pain, and level of quality of life.

 

Research Procedure                                                             

There were five subjects selected from both genders within the age range of 18 to70 years of age. The additional inclusion criterion is the experience of lower back pain for at least 12 weeks. Respondents were asked to sign a research consent form after a thorough explanation of the purpose and proceedings of the research. The research requires a commitment of the subjects to 6 consecutive sessions, with one week interval in between sessions, consisting of 6 balances and a final follow up upon the conduct of the 6th balance. Assessment of the subjects includes a history of back pain, rating their pain on an analog scale of 1-to 10.

 

Results                                                                                              

Pain level

Prior to the kinesiology procedure, the highest reported pain score by three respondents or 60% of the samples,  is 7 in a scale of 1 to 10, one being the lowest and ten highest, the lowest of which is six.  All 5 respondents responded with significant decreased pain sensation after intervention standard kinesiology pelvic stress procedure with balancing. In the post balancing period, the highest pain perception is 4.5 reported by 40% or two clients, followed by a pain scale of 2 by two respondents, 40%, and the lowest is one for one respondent or 20%.

Figure 1. Pain levels before and after- 1-10 pain scale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of life

Quality of life is measured in the research through the participants’ feedback on how they are contented or satisfied with their back using a scale of 1 to 5, 1 referring to highest satisfaction and 5 with greatest dissatisfaction. Majority or 80% of the respondents  presented with positive feedback on improved back comfort with kinesiology, while 20%, or one respondent claimed there was no significant difference in his health status before and after the intervention.

Figure 2. Quality of Life- 1-5 Scale of how content participants were with their back

Range of Motion

The respondents’ range of motion (ROM) utilizing the pelvic stress procedure  showed significant improvement with a general reduction in flexion, including left and right lateral flexions.  All respondents presented with a decrease in the flexion ROM, 60 or three subjects with decreased extension, 20% or one presented with no significant difference, while another 20 or one with increased extension after the pelvic stress intervention. The mean differences in the range of motion before and after balancing are as follows: flexion 3.5 cm, extension 6cm, left lateral flexion 3.4 cm, and right lateral flexion 3.7cm.

Table 1. Range of Motion before and after balancing

ROM A B C D E Mean
Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post
Flexion 11.5  9.5 0 0 6 0 16 10 28.5 25 3.5
Extension 143 129 143 129 134 128 159 159 126 130 6
Left Lat flexion 47 43 44 41 49 49 54 49 52 47 3.4
Right Lat flexion 46 43 46 40 51 48 44 42 51 46.5 3.7

 

Findings                                                                                            

There were three limitations to this research project. One was that one of the subjects who had agreed to participate did not attend. A second limitation was that I did the balancing myself, and due to unexpectedly spraining my wrist I was unable to conduct balancing for two out of the five subjects in the follow-up session. All five subjects completed the scales for outcomes after balancing treatments. A third limitation was that five is only a small number of subjects and there were differences in their presenting problems for lower back pain so the subject’s different situations could have affected their outcomes. In particular, Subject D, had the lowest changes in range of motion and level of pain, but as these scores improved the hypothesis was supported. This subject also had no change in quality of life, so in this one case did not support the hypothesis. The positivist approach based on scores alone is unable to show the individual situation. Subject D had been diagnosed with Ankylosing Spondolitis in the week of follow up and so his outlook in general was down, which explains why in that week he reported feeling discontent if he had it for the rest of his life.

With the inclusion criteria measured in the study, namely, pain, quality of life and range of motion, results revealed significant improvements in theses three areas. From a pain scale of 6 to 7 prior to balancing, the pain perception decreased to 1 to 4.5 on a scale of 1 to 10. In the quality of life measures on the subjects’ satisfaction with their back, 80% or the majority claimed positive changes, while 20% reported no improvement. In the range of motion criterion, all five respondents presented with reduction in flexion ROM, most of them, 60%, with decreased extension.

 

Conclusion    

Kinesiology is a promising treatment modality to explore in the management of lower back pain, for acute, subacute and chronic types. The individualized assessment of clients is paramount to the kind and intensity of kinesiology interventions to be employed. Pelvic stress balancing, for instance, can improve the range of motion of the vertebrae and pelvic region, as well as reduces flexion limitations associated with the development of flexion deformities and musculoskeletal debilities. The study yielded results suggesting that kinesiology can significantly reduce back pain, improve quality of life satisfaction and comfort, and improves the range of motion of the lower back. Further studies using more respondents need to be done with higher level of control over extraneous variables to establish the validity and reliability of these results.

 

References

 

AlBahel, F., Hafez, A.R., Zakaria, A.R., et.al. (2013) Kinesio taping for the treatment of mechanical low back pain. IDOSI Publications, doi: 10.5829/idosi.wasj.2013.22.01.72182

Al Mazroa, M.A. (2012) Years lived with disability (YLDs) for 1160 sequelae of 289 diseases and injuries 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Lancet, 2012, 380(9859):2163- 96. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61729-2.

Assendelft WJ, Morton SC, Yu EI, Suttorp MJ, Shekelle PG (2004) Spinal manipulative therapy for low back pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Issue 1. Art. No.: CD0000447.doi: 10.1002/14651858. CD000447.pub2.

Association of Systemic Kinesiology (n.d.) History of Kinesiology. Association of Kinesiology in Ireland. Retrieved from http://www.kinesiology.ie/history-of-kinesiology/

Duthey, B. (2013) Background paper 6.24: low back pain. WHO. , Priority Medicines for Europe and the World. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/medicines/areas/priority_medicines/BP6_24LBP.pdf

Eardley, S., Brien, S., Little, P., Prescott, P., and Lweith, G. (2013) Professional Kinesiology Practice for chronic low back pain: Single-blind, randomized controlled pilot study. Forsch Komplementmed, 20:180-188, doi: 10.1159/000346291. Retrieved from http://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/346291

Engers A, Jellema P, Wensing M, van der Windt D, Grol R, van Tulder MW (2008) Individual patient education for low back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Review 1:CD004057

Girasole, G.J. and Hartman, C. (2012). The Seven Minute Back Pain Solution. Harlequin Enterprises Limited. Ontario.

Glass, S., Hatzel, B and Albrecht, R. (2014). Kinesiology for Dummies. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.  Hoboken, New Jersey.

Guarino, A.H. (2010). Get your lower back pain under control and get on with life. The Johns Hopkins University Press. Baltimore.

Hoy, D., Bain, C., Williams, . et. al. (2012)  systematic review of the global prevalence of low back pain. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 64 (2): 2038-2037, doi: 10.1002/art.34347. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.34347/pdf

Iles R, Taylor NF, Davidson M, O’Halloran P (2011) Telephone coaching can increase activity levels for people with nonchronic low back pain: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 57: 231–238.

Khadilkar A, Odebiyi DO, Brosseau L, Wells GA (2008) Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) versus

placebo for chronic low-back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 4: CD003008.

Owen, L and Lebowitz, H.R. (2013). Yoga for a healthy lower back. Shambhala Publications Inc. Boston, Massachusette.

Paolono, M., Bernetti, A., Fratocchi, G., Mangone, M., et.al. (2011) kinesio taping applied to lumbar muscles influences clinical and electromyographic characteristics inchronic low back pain patients. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med, 47:237-44.

Reed, S and Kendall-Reed, P. (2004). The Complete Back Bible- A practical Manual for understanding, preventing and treating back pain. Robert rose Inc., Ontario, Canada.

Roelofs PDDM, Deyo RA, Koes BW, Scholten RJ, van Tulder MW (2008) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 1: CD000396.

Smeets RJ (2009) Do lumbar stabilising exercises reduce pain and disability in patients with recurrent low back pain? Australian Journal of Physiotherapy 55: 138.

Souter, K. (2011). 50 Things you can do today to manage Back Pain. Summersdale Publishers Ltd. West Sussex.

Taylor NF, Dodd KJ, Shields N, Bruder A (2007) Therapeutic exercise in physiotherapy practice is beneficial: a summary of systematic reviews 2002–2005. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy 53: 7–16.

Ullrich, P.F. (2007). Spine-Health . Lower Back Pain Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment.http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/lower-back-pain/lower-back-pain-symptoms-diagnosis-and-treatment 1999-2015 Veritashealth.com

Wakley, J. (2012). Smart Guide to back care. Hammersmith Books Limited. London.

Woolf, A.D, Pfleger, B. (2003) Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 81(9):646–56.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendices

Protocol

 

Will Kinesiology increase the range of motion and reduce pain in lower back pain suffers for a better quality in life?

 

  1. Require 4-6 subjects, can be any gender & aged 18-70.

 

  1.  Lower back pain suffers for at least 12 wks.

 

  1. Consent form to be signed and dated prior to commencement of research, subjects to commit to 6 consecutive sessions at intervals of weekly sessions, consisting of 6 balances and a final follow-up after the 6th balance, times and dates to be discussed and booked at time of consent. If subject is better before the 6 sessions there may be fewer balances.

 

  1. Interview with subjects to gather information-
  • History of back pain,
  • Pain rating using a 1-10 scale,
  • Before and After 1st and last session, monitoring of their Range Of Motion (ROM)- bending forward-flexion, bending back-extension, bending left and right laterally-

 

  1. Using a standard kinesiology pelvic stress procedure obtained by O’Neil kinesiology, subjects will be balanced, using appropriate corrections, according to subject’s needs.

 

  1. Balancing and follow up to be completed within 6 sessions weekly.

 

  1. Research methods to be used are positivism and qualitative methodology to collect and record data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Consent form

 

Will Kinesiology increase the range of motion and reduce pain in lower back pain suffers for a better quality in life?

 

  • I ………………………………………………..consent to participate in this kinesiology research with Zoe for lower back pain and agree to be honest and open at all times during the research.
  • I understand that this is for research purposes and that my personal details will be kept private and confidential, and will not be disclosed to any other parties.
  • I understand that Kinesiology is not a diagnosis or cure to back pain and works on an energetic level.
  • I understand that this is for research and that there is no exchange of money, and that I am receiving 6 Sessions to the value of $720 for free in exchange for my time.
  • I will commit to at least 1hr and 30 min kinesiology balances at intervals of weekly sessions of up to 6 Sessions, the dates and times are agreed upon below:

 

 

Back Balance week 1:  Date: …………………………………… Time: …………………

Back Balance week 2:  Date: …………………………………… Time: …………………

Back Balance week 3:  Date: …………………………………… Time: …………………

Back Balance week 4:  Date: …………………………………… Time: …………………

Back Balance week 5:  Date: …………………………………… Time: …………………

Back Balance week 6:  Date: …………………………………… Time: …………………

 

 

Subject Signature: _____________________________ Date: _______________

Researcher Signature: __________________________ Date: _______________

 

Pelvic stress Balance- O’neil Kinesiology Muscular skeletal Procedures

Set up-

  1. Have person lie prone. Observe leg length with client prone and knees bent 90*. Shorter leg:   L/R
  2. Client holds two handed CL on each sacroiliac joint one at a time, PL the IC. Use hamstrings as IM. Unlocking IM indicates compromised side. Compromised side:  L/R
  3. If both sides show IC, use priority mode to establish 1st side to be balanced. First side to balance:   L/R
  4. With client supine, only one of the following will be the priority to correct:
  1. Push on anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) on side that showed as priority, PL the IC. (Posterior)
  2. Pull on posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) on side that showed as priority, PL the IC. (Anterior)
  1. PL all pelvis support muscles: (test all left side then test all right side, check nerve association & PL)

Muscle                                            Meridian                          Pg.             nerv ass.                     Before                                       After

Quadratus Lumborum                      LI                                202         T12 & L1-L3         L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                  L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Rectus Abdominals                            SI                                76            T7-T12                     F  1.OF/UF  B 1.OF/UF                                    F  1.OF/UF  B 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Transverse & oblique                        SI                                80            T7-T12 & L1         L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Latissimus Dorsi                                                      Sp                               44            C6-C8                       L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Adductors                                                Pc                               118         L2-L5 &S1             L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Gluteus Medius                                    Pc                               114         L4-S1                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Piriformis                                                  Pc                               124         S1-S2                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Quadriceps                                              SI                                72            L2-L4                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Gracilis                                                       Th                               140         L3-L4                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Sartorius                                                    Th                               136         L2-L3                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Psoas                                                            Ki                                102         L2-L4                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Tensor Fascia lata                                 LI                                192         L4-S1                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Anterior Neck flexors                         St                                18            C1-C7                       L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Posterior Neck extensors                 St                                23            C1-C8                       L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Gluteus Maximus                                Pc                               128         L5-S2                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Sacrospinalis                                          Bl                                88            T1-T12                     L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Hamstrings                                              LI                                196         L5-S3                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Iliacus                                                         ki                                106         L2-L3                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

 

 

  1. Elevate with blocks posterior ilium and opposite ischium according to these criteria in the context of the involved side:

Circle where blocks go & remove after 10mins.

  1. Left posterior ilium- Raise left Ilium & opposite Ischium
  2. Left anterior Ilium- Raise right Ilium & opposite Ischium
  3. Right posterior Ilium- Raise right Ilium & opposite Ischium
  4. Right anterior Ilium- Raise left Ilium & opposite ischium

 

  1. Complete Sips procedure.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. Access DSS/SS

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. Amygdala. Correct all point/ pairs that cause IC.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. Find relevant emotion, thought, essence & spiritual aspects. PL the IC & discuss.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. Check for age recession. PL priority age.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Correction

 

  1. Hold ESD points & discuss emotions etc.

 

  1. Remove blocks (within 10 mins of putting them in)

 

  1. Recheck pelvis & the muscles. Correct all muscles remaining UF or OF.

 

  1. Hold reactivity mode, PL the IC.

 

  1. Hold reactor mode, PL. Hold specific muscle mode, PL.

 

 

Muscle                                            Meridian                          Pg.             nerv ass.                     Before                                       After

Quadratus Lumborum                      LI                                202         T12 & L1-L3         L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                  L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Rectus Abdominals                            SI                                76            T7-T12                     F  1.OF/UF  B 1.OF/UF                                    F  1.OF/UF  B 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Transverse & oblique                        SI                                80            T7-T12 & L1         L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Latissimus Dorsi                                                      Sp                               44            C6-C8                       L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Adductors                                                Pc                               118         L2-L5 &S1             L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Gluteus Medius                                    Pc                               114         L4-S1                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Piriformis                                                  Pc                               124         S1-S2                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Quadriceps                                              SI                                72            L2-L4                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Gracilis                                                       Th                               140         L3-L4                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Sartorius                                                    Th                               136         L2-L3                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Psoas                                                            Ki                                102         L2-L4                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Tensor Fascia lata                                 LI                                192         L4-S1                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Anterior Neck flexors                         St                                18            C1-C7                       L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Posterior Neck extensors                 St                                23            C1-C8                       L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Gluteus Maximus                                Pc                               128         L5-S2                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Sacrospinalis                                          Bl                                88            T1-T12                     L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Hamstrings                                              LI                                196         L5-S3                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

Iliacus                                                         ki                                106         L2-L3                        L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF                                    L  1.OF/UF  R 1.OF/UF

8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI                         8.UI/OI       8.UI/OI

 

  1. Scan muscles in step 5. PL the reactor muscle and record it.

 

  1. Monitor all muscles in step 5 & PL all unlocking muscles, and record these reactives.

 

 

  1. Complete SIPS procedure.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. Complete priority corrections as required.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. PL reactor muscle.
  2. Re-monitor all reactive muscles, all should now lock.

Challenge-

  1. Recheck pelvis muscle that won’t lock.

Note: hips not level: Psoas, Adductors, Gluteus Med. Pelvis twisted: Psoas, Tensia fascia Lata, Sartorius, Abdominals

  1. Recheck leg length as per step 1, and challenge as per step 2.
  2. Challenge centring reflexes involved- hyoid, gaits & colocals, PL all IC and correct, do these in another session together with the Cranial setup.

Monitor- pre & post when completed all sessions of Pelvic Stress balances depending on how many the subject needs:

 

          ROM

             

      Pre Balance

 

Post Balance

Flexion                            cm                      cm
Extension                            cm                      cm
Left Lat Flex                            cm                      cm
Right Lat Flex                            cm                      cm
Results                            cm                      cm     

 

 

Graphs and Tables of results

 

Pain levels before and after- 1-10 pain scale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of Life- 1-5 Scale of how content participants were with their back

 

 

Subject A

 

 

 

ROM Pre Balance (cm) Post Balance (cm)
Flexion 11.5 9.5
Extension 143 129
Left Lat Flex 47 43
Right Lat Flex 46 43

 

 

 

 

 

Subject B

ROM Pre Balance (cm) Post Balance (cm)
Flexion 0 0
Extension 143 129
Left Lat Flex 44 41
Right Lat Flex 46 40

 

 

Subject C

 

ROM Pre Balance (cm) Post Balance (cm)
Flexion 6 0
Extension 134 128
Left Lat Flex 49 49
Right Lat Flex 51 48

 

 

Subject D

ROM Pre Balance Post Balance
Flexion 16 10
Extension 159 159
Left Lat Flex 54 49
Right Lat Flex 44 42

 

 

Subject E

ROM Pre Balance Post Balance
Flexion 28.5 25
Extension 126 130
Left Lat Flex 52 47
Right Lat Flex 51 46.5

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